?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Mar. 18th, 2009 @ 01:14 pm Buyer Beware
About this Entry
spaghetti
lobsterbox:
I wish we didn't have to think of such things, but something that happened at work the other day highlighted the need for people who buy stones, especially expensive one, to take care.

I work in a metaphysical store that sells books, gifts, jewelry, and many lovely stones, which is both great and terrible for my mild stone addiction.

The other day we had a couple in the store near closing time. They were nice, and while the wife was paying, I was chatting with the husband. He excitedly told me that he had something unusual with him, and took out a small heart, about an inch from tip to bumps. It was made of opalite, a pretty kind of fused glass that has a vaguely opalish glow inside. He was telling me about how he got it in Holbrook (sp?), Arizona and had tried to make it into a necklace and blah blah blah. I showed him the opalite hearts we sell (we sell very few manmade stones, only opalite and goldstone, though some of our natural stones have been treated to bring out their color, like many specimens you'll find), larger than his, and as he picked one up I saw his eyes widen.

"Honey!" he said, taking it to his wife, "Look what they have here. And so cheap! 8 dollars! I paid 85 for mine but, well, mine's an opal." At that point I realized: he thought the little glass heart he bought in Arizona was an opal, and had paid 85 bucks for the pleasure of that lie. Oh, crap.

His wife told him that his little heart had more of a fire inside, and therefore couldn't be the same material, and I didn't dare correct them because I felt bad enough about accidentally causing him to second guess himself. If I'd known he thought it was real, I wouldn't have said anything because what could be gained by that?

Now, 85 for an opal of that size WOULD be a good deal, but man, someone lied to that poor guy big time and sold him glass as an opal. On the other hand, I feel like opals are pretty distinctive, and one should be able to tell them apart.

To review: this is opalite.

This is opal. Pretty different, eh?

So, buyer beware of jerks who try to sell you glass and say it's an opal.



X-posted to crystalhealing.
[User Picture Icon]
From:keziah_rose
Date:March 18th, 2009 05:40 pm (UTC)
(Entry Link)
Oh, man, that really sucks! Poor guy. The other big one out there is turquoise, I get that one a lot. So much of it these days is dyed howlite passed off as genuine, which is why I refuse to buy turquoise online and usually wait until I head out to AZ to get it locally. Also those things called "blueberry quartz" or insert other fruit. Really glass.
[User Picture Icon]
From:lobsterbox
Date:March 18th, 2009 05:44 pm (UTC)
(Entry Link)
Oh I know, turqouise is a terrible one, indeed! I'd certainly steer clear of the online stuff, too.
[User Picture Icon]
From:keziah_rose
Date:March 18th, 2009 07:04 pm (UTC)
(Entry Link)
By the way, TOTALLY envy your job. I'd love to work in a metaphysical store, but we don't have any in my city. Boo.
[User Picture Icon]
From:lobsterbox
Date:March 18th, 2009 08:09 pm (UTC)
(Entry Link)
Thanks! As far as retail jobs go, it's pretty cool. The customers (barring the occasional pill) are generally the nicest of any place I've worked, and there are always lovely stones to tempt me into spending chunks of my paycheck.
[User Picture Icon]
From:lukadia
Date:March 22nd, 2009 02:59 am (UTC)
(Entry Link)
I run into this kind of thing sometimes on eBay. Drives me nuts. I once saw a guy selling 6" long perfect genuine blood-red quartz specimens (actually cut glass) for $8 apiece.

They looked pretty cool and I might have bought one for a paperweight until I saw a guarantee of authenticity. Le sigh.